Portugal itinerary suggestions: 7, 10 or 14 days in Portugal

Planning a trip to Portugal? Then you’ve come to the right place. We’ve visited this wonderful country on several occasions and yet we keep going back on a regular basis. Portugal has so much to offer that you could easily spend several weeks there. But where to go in Portugal if you’re short on time? Can you still see the highlights in just one to two weeks? Yes, you can, if you have a well-thought-out Portugal itinerary, that is. That’s where we come in. Whether you’re looking to spend 14, 10 or 7 days in Portugal, we’ve put together 4 Portugal sample itineraries that cover most must-sees.

Portugal itinerary 7 days: Lisbon and Porto

Spending 1 week in Portugal and more into cities than beaches? This is the best Portugal itinerary for that classic cultural escape you have in mind. It allows you to visit both capital Lisbon as charming Porto and allows plenty of time to visit some of those other iconic places in Portugal such as the Sintra palaces, inland Évora and the Douro Valley. Check it out on this Portugal map:

Portugal map showing the 7 day Portugal itinerary to Porto and Lisbon

The best time to visit Portugal for a cultural escape is spring or fall. The harvesting period is the preferred period for the Douro Valley, making late September and early October the preferred time to visit this Portugal must-see. Avoid peak summer because the heat makes it less comfortable to complete this intensive Portugal travel itinerary.

– Day by day trip itinerary

A day trip to Evora can be included in this itinerary, unless you choose to stay only 5 days in Portugal

Day 1: Lisbon.
Start your day from the highest point in the city, the Alfama and Graça districts, where you can enjoy the scenic views from the miradouros, visit the Castelo de São Jorge and get lost in a maze of winding cobblestone streets. Follow the charming staircases to the Baixa district, where you’ll find the Praça do Comércio, the triumphal gate and the Praça Dom Pedro IV or Rossio square. Then, take the Santa Justa elevator to Chiado district with its enchanting Carmo Convent at the Camões Square. It’s the perfect, lively place to end your day before taking tram 28 back to your hotel.

Day 2: Belém.
Belém is actually one of the Lisbon districts. But since it’s located further away from what’s considered the true city centre, most visitors head there for the day. In Belém you’ll find the Jerónimos monastery, a UNESCO World Heritage site, as well as the picturesque Belém tower and the Discoveries Monument. Oh, and let’s not forget that this district is home to the mouthwatering Pastéis de Belém. You can buy these little custard tarts at the Fábrica Pastéis de Belém. Apart from the interesting sights, Belém is a really nice and spacious district, perfect for a riverside stroll.

To get from Lisbon to Belém, you take tram 15 from Praça da Figueira (Baixa district) to the Jardim de Algés (Belém district).

Day 3: Day trip to Sintra.
The one Portugal must-see that sparks the imagination more than any other is the cultural landscape of Sintra. It’s where fairytale palaces, intriguing gardens and sweeping views over the Sintra-Cascais Natural Park await visitors from all corners of the world. A visit to romantic Sintra is a must and will likely be the highlight of your Portugal itinerary. Must-sees include the National Pena Palace, the Moorish Castle, the Quinta da Regaleira gardens and the Monserrate Palace. If you leave early enough and the crowds are reasonable, you’ll be able to visit 2 or maybe 3 palaces.

To get from Lisbon to Sintra, take a train from Rossio Station and you’ll arrive in Sintra after about 40 minutes. The railway station is located close to centre of Sintra but to reach some of the palaces, you’ll need to take a hop on hop off bus or a pedicab. Alternatively, you can join this organized tour.

Day 4: Day trip to Évora.
Évora, located in the heart of the Alentejo region in Central Portugal, is one of Portugal’s oldest cities. It’s an authentic city with plenty of historical elements such as the Roman ruins and the university building. And then there’s the macabre Chapel of Bones with stacks of skulls and bones from floor to ceiling.

To get from Lisbon to Sintra, take a train from the Santa Apolónia railway station to reach your destination in about 90 minutes. From there, it’s a 20-minute walk to the centre of Évora. Alternatively, you could join this organized tour.

Day 5: Early morning transfer from Lisbon to Porto.
Check out of your Lisbon hotel early and head to Porto; you’ll be arriving just in time for lunch. The Alfa Pendular express train is your best option to get from Lisbon’s Santa Apolónia railway station to Porto’s Campanhã station. From there, you’ll need to transfer to reach the Sao Bento train station in the centre of Porto.

After checking in to your hotel, head to Porto’s oldest district, Ribeira, and explore the winding streets flanked by a vivid palette of decorated façades lining the Douro’s northern banks. Admire the azulejo tiles that adorn facades of the Almas Chapel and the Carmo Church. Porto’s beauty is not limited to its outdoor sights but can just as well be admired inside its many intriguing buildings. The Livaria Lello for example, one of the world’s most beautiful bookstores, the Igreja dos Clérigos or the azulejos inside the railway station.

Day 6: Day trip to Douro Valley.
Portugal’s most famous river flows from north-central Spain to the Atlantic over a distance of 897 km (557 mi). Porto is the city where the Douro, literally meaning Golden River, mouths in the Atlantic ocean. There’s no better travel base to explore the Douro Valley on a day trip. You can explore the region’s majestic scenery by cruise or by train. Take in the scenic views from one of the miradouros that dot hilltops, such as Casal de Loivos or São Salvador do Mundo viewpoints.

From Porto’s São Bento station, you can take a direct train to the Spanish border. Recommended stops along this journey are the towns of Régua and Pinhão. Or you can join an organized tour such as this one. Do make sure to book well ahead, especially during harvest-season at the end of September and perhaps you could participate in picking or crushing the country’s finest grapes.

Day 7: Porto.
Cross the Ponte D. Luís I, arching over the Douro river, to reach Vila Nova de Gaia. This area is known for its wineries that line the river banks. It’s the perfect place to sample port wine, a quintessential experience to end this 7-day Portugal itinerary. Enjoy the Douro views from the Teleférico de Gaia cable car as you head back to the city centre to check out of your hotel.

– Accommodation

When you’re only spending 7 days in Portugal, you don’t want to spend your time checking in and out of hotels or criss-crossing the city by taxi. That’s why we’ve cherry-picked some wonderful hotels in privileged locations.

  • 4 nights in Lisbon: Both The Lisboans Apartments and Memmo Alfama are located in the enchanting Alfama district, just a short walk from the historic Santa Apolónia railway station and close to the stop of iconic 28 E (E stands for Eléctrico or tram).
  • 2 nights in Porto: The Porto A.S. 1829 is located in the heart of Porto yet within walking distance of the Sao Bento train station.

Depending on your arrival and departure times, you could either skip Évora or add an additional night and spend 8 days in Portugal instead of 7.

– Getting there and around

  • Getting to Portugal: Fly into Lisbon and out of Porto (or vice versa). Alternatively, you could arrive at and depart from the same airport, taking into account an extra transfer between Lisbon and Porto. This will, however, take up about half a day of your time in Portugal.
    Compare prices on flights with Skyscanner.
  • Traveling between Lisbon and Porto: This 7-day Portugal itinerary doesn’t require a rental car. Traveling between Lisbon and Porto is easiest by train, from the Santa Apolónia railway station in Lisbon to the Sao Bento train station (after a transfer at the Campanhã train station) in Porto. Of course, you could drive from Lisbon to Porto but it’ll be much more of a hassle than taking the train.
    Click here to get the best car rental deal for your Portugal itinerary.
  • Day trips: You can take the train for the day trips too, or book these as a tour. Here are our favorite suggestions:

Portugal itinerary 7 days: Lisbon to Algarve

If you like the idea of spending a week in Portugal but prefer a mix of city and beach, then this 7-day Portugal itinerary is for you. Combining a cultural break in Lisbon with some minor exploring and plenty of beach time in the Algarve, especially in the Lagos area, allows you to indulge in the best of both worlds. Check it out on this Portugal map:

Portugal map showing the 7 day Portugal itinerary from Lisbon to Algarve

The best time to visit Portugal on a combined cultural-beach break is late spring, summer or fall. Do note that, should you decide to visit in peak summer, the heat will make your visit to the Lisbon area somewhat intensive. But just think of all the gorgeous Portugal beaches you’ll explore next and you’ll feel instantly cooler.

– Day by day itinerary

This is the best 7 day Portugal itinerary for those looking to combine city and beach
This Portugal road trip itinerary takes you from Lisbon to Algarve
This 7-day itinerary is one of the best road trips Portugal

Day 1: Lisbon.
Similar to day 1 in the first Portugal itinerary.

Day 2: Belém.
Similar to day 2 in the first Portugal itinerary.

Day 3: Day trip to either Sintra or Évora.
Similar to day 3 or 4 in the first Portugal itinerary.
We’d recommend heading to Sintra on this day trip, especially if the Chapel of Bones is your main motivation to see Évora. Why? Well, there’s another creepy chapel, located right in the Algarve. Continue reading to find out more.

Day 4: Early morning drive from Lisbon to Lagos.
Check out of your Lisbon hotel early, pick up your rental car and head to the Algarve region. We’d strongly suggest to leave the highway after the city of Grândola and take the N262 instead, direction Vila Nova de Milfontes. It’s the starting point for your Portugal road trip along the Costa Vicentina. Enjoy the varied landscape of the Southwest Alentejo and Vicentine Coast Natural Park and take your time to visit some extraordinary Portugal beaches such as Praia de Odeceixe. The cute whitewashed town of Aljezur makes for an excellent lunch stop. Explore the sand dunes and lagoon at Praia da Bordeira before heading to Cape St. Vincent and Sagres. After visiting the Sagres fortress, you’re ready to check in to your Lagos hotel.

This Lisbon to Lagos drive will take you around 4h 15m. This is 90 minutes longer compared to the highway route, which takes 2h 45m, but the stunning landscape along this beautiful stretch of Portuguese coast is well worth the detour. We promise! This Portugal road trip was the highlight of our recent holiday.

Day 5: Algarve beaches and/or coastal hike.
Beach-bums will be delighted to hear that the Lagos area is home to some of the most beautiful beaches in Portugal. Our favorites are Marinha Beach (Praia da Marinha), Carvalho Beach (Praia do Carvalho), Vale de Centeanes Beach (Praia do Vale de Centeanes) and Camilo Beach (Praia do Camilo). (The links point to photos and details about each of these beaches in one of our previous Portugal blog posts.)
If you prefer a more active exploration of the coast, then we’d suggest the Seven Hanging Valleys hike. This 3.5 mile (or 5.7 km) hike starts from Praia da Marinha. If that sounds a bit too intensive – summer heat and all – then the mellow Carvoeiro boardwalk might be better suited, starting from the cute fishing village of Carvoeiro.

Day 6: Lagos city and coastline.
Start your day with a boat tour… or two. This part of the Algarve coast is known for its towering cliffs, intriguing sea caves and mysterious rock formations. Two coastal must-visits are the Ponta Da Piedade and the Benagil cave. The hidden beach inside the Benagil cave is only open for kayakers and SUPpers but boats are allowed to enter the cave.
The old town of Lagos is incredibly charming. Admire the purple jacaranda trees decorating the Praça Luís de Camões, visit the wonderful St. Antonio church, see the statue of Henry the Navigator and learn about the dark side of the Age of Discoveries at the Slave Market museum.

Day 7: Early morning transfer from Lagos to Faro.
Check out of your Lagos hotel early and head to Faro. Regular driving time is about an hour. However, during the summer months the roads can get really congested. Take that into account so you don’t miss your flight. Best case scenario, you still have half a day left to explore historic Faro. Start your walking tour at the glorious Arco da Villa, enjoy the views from the Largo da Sé cathedral, discover the cloister garden at the Infante Dom Henrique Archaeological Museum and – if you dare – visit Faro’s Chapel of Bones in the Igreja do Carmo. If you have some time left, then we’d love to suggest a boat tour in the Ria Formosa Natural Park. Tours such as this one leave from the marina, which is located right in the city centre.

– Accommodation

When you’re only spending one week in Portugal, you don’t want to spend your time checking in and out of hotels or criss-crossing the city by taxi. That’s why we’ve hand-picked some amazing hotels in prime locations.

  • 3 nights in Lisbon: Both The Lisboans Apartments and Memmo Alfama are located in the enchanting Alfama district, just a short walk from the historic Santa Apolónia railway station and close to the stop of iconic 28 E (E stands for Eléctrico or tram).
  • 3 nights in Lagos: Two gorgeous boutique hotels in the heart of Lagos are Casa Mãe & Lagos Avenida Hotel. The family-friendly Cascade Wellness Resort offers stunning ocean views.

If you have the luxury to make this Portugal itinerary 8 days instead of 7, then you don’t have to choose between Évora and Sintra. Just stay an extra night in Lisbon and you’ll be able to see both of these gems.

– Getting there and around

  • Getting to Portugal: Fly into Lisbon and out of Faro (or vice versa). Alternatively, you could arrive at and depart from the same airport, taking into account an extra transfer between Lisbon and the Algarve. This will, however, take up about half a day of your time in Portugal.
    Compare prices on flights with Skyscanner.
  • Traveling between Lisbon and Lagos: This 7-day Portugal itinerary does require a rental car from day 4 to day 7. Not just because public transport options are limited, but also because it allows you to drive along the Southwest Alentejo and Vicentine Coast Natural Park. It’s one of the most beautiful places in Portugal thanks to its pristine dunes, wildflowers and unique birdlife. Do take into account the one-way fee for the rental car, since you’ll be returning it to another city than where you picked it up.
    Click here to get the best car rental deal for your Portugal itinerary.
  • Algarve boat trips: Especially if you plan to visit Portugal during summer, we’d recommend booking ahead. Here are our favorite suggestions:

Portugal itinerary 10 days: Porto to Algarve

Are you looking to spend 10 days in Portugal? That’s the perfect amount of time to see just about all of the country’s highlights. Visit the popular cities of Lisbon and Porto with all the interesting stops in between before heading to the Algarve for a relaxter kind of exploration. After completing this 10-day Portugal itinerary, all your Portugal must-see boxes will be checked.. Check it out on the Portugal map:

Portugal map showing the 10 day Portugal itinerary suggestion

The best time to visit Portugal on a combined cultural-beach break is spring or fall. Since it involves more city time than beach time, we would recommend against summer to keep it cool and comfortable.

– Day by day itinerary

Aveiro is a must-visit on any 10 day Portugal itinerary

Day 1: Porto.
Cross the D. Luís I bridge, arching over the Douro river, to reach Vila Nova de Gaia. This area is known for its wineries that line the river banks. It’s the perfect place to sample port wine, a quintessential experience to start this 10-day Portugal itinerary. Enjoy the Douro views from the Teleférico de Gaia cable car as you head back to the other side of the river. Visit some of the Porto highlights such as the Almas Chapel and the Carmo Church with their azulejo tiles, the famous Livaria Lello bookshop and the Igreja dos Clérigos.

Day 2: Amarante and Douro Valley.
Porto is the city where the Douro, literally meaning Golden River, mouths in the Atlantic ocean. Retrace the Douro’s steps – or drops – during a one day scenic road trip in the valley. After a quick stop inenchanting Amarante, head to the Vila Real and Sabrosa area. From there, make your way down to the river to the towns of Régua and Pinhão and take in the most gorgeous Douro valley views. on the Douro’s northern banks. Stop at one of the miradouros such as São Salvador do Mundo or Casal de Loivos viewpoint near Pinhão and take it all in.

Day 3: Porto to Aveiro, Costa Nova and Batalha.
A direct Porto to Lisbon drive would take about 3 hours but there are some interesting towns along this route that certainly deserve a visit. Hence, another full day of sightseeing ahead. Aveiro for one, known for its flat bottomed gondola-like molineiro boats that float the canals. Opposite from the lagoon, you’ll find the Costa Nova coastal resort with its picture-perfect striped beach houses. This seaside location calls for a mouth-watering fresh seafood lunch.
Batalha is your next stop on this 10-day Portugal itinerary. The Santa Maria da Vitória monastery is one of the finest Gothic-Manueline buildings in Portugal. Highlights include the equestrian statue of general Nuno Álvares Pereira, the magnificent Manueline church portal, the Royal Cloisters, the stained-glass windows in the Chapter House and the Founder’s Chapel. Behind the church, you’ll find a refined Manueline portal and a beautiful open space called the Imperfect Chapels.

Day 4: Nazaré and Óbidos
Nazaré is a cute and relaxed seaside gem near Batalha that has a reputation for being one of Portugal’s surfing hotspots. But you don’t need to be a surfer to appreciate the town’s laid-back atmosphere and miles-long sandy beach dotted with traditional fishermen‘s boats. There’s a wonderful viewpoint over Nazaré from the O Sitio district, which can be reached by funicular.
The walled town of Óbidos is located a bit further inland. Walk the city walls – just be careful, especially when you’re traveling with kids, since the inner side has no railing – and explore the narrow cobbled streets with traditional houses, all in the shadow of an impressive medieval castle.

Afterwards, head to Lisbon where you can either park the car at your accommodation or return it since you won’t be needing it the next 2 days.

Day 5: Lisbon.
Start your day from the highest point in the city, the Alfama and Graça districts, where you can enjoy the scenic views from the miradouros, visit the Castelo de São Jorge and get lost in a maze of winding cobblestone streets. Follow the charming staircases to the Baixa district, where you’ll find the Praça do Comércio, the triumphal gate and the Praça Dom Pedro IV or Rossio square. Then, take the Santa Justa elevator to Chiado district with its enchanting Carmo Convent at the Camões Square. It’s the perfect, lively place to end your day before taking tram 28 back to your hotel.

Day 6: Day trip to Sintra.
The one Portugal must-see that sparks the imagination more than any other is the cultural landscape of Sintra. It’s where fairytale palaces, intriguing gardens and sweeping views over the Sintra-Cascais Natural Park await visitors from all corners of the world. A visit to romantic Sintra is a must and will likely be the highlight of your Portugal itinerary. Must-sees include the National Pena Palace, the Moorish Castle, the Quinta da Regaleira gardens and the Monserrate Palace. If you leave early enough and the crowds are reasonable, you’ll be able to visit 2 or maybe 3 palaces.

To get from Lisbon to Sintra, take a train from Rossio Station and you’ll arrive in Sintra after about 40 minutes. The railway station is located close to centre of Sintra but to reach some of the palaces, you’ll need to take a hop on hop off bus or a pedicab. Alternatively, you can join this organized tour.

Day 7: Belém and Lisbon to Algarve drive.
Start your day early in pretty Belém and and visit this district’s highlights: the Jerónimos monastery, the picturesque Belém tower and the Discoveries Monument. Then stock up on those mouthwatering Pastéis de Belém for an unforgettable road trip to Lagos.
Take the highway up to Grândola, then drive up the N262 direction Vila Nova de Milfontes to enjoy the Southwest Alentejo and Vicentine Coast Natural Park. Depending on the season, Aljezur could make for a perfect dinner stop but just make sure to jump back in the car half an hour before dark. That way, you can easily find your way to Lagos.

Day 8: Lagos beaches and/or coastal hike.
Similar to day 5 in the previous 7-day Lisbon to Algarve road trip itinerary. Trust us, you’ll need this lazy beach day after a week of intense exploration.

Day 9: Lagos city and coastline.
Similar to day 6 in the previous 7-day Lisbon to Algarve itinerary. And, since day 7 didn’t allow enough time to head to Sagres, we’d recommend to add this rugged southwestern corner of Algarve to today’s itinerary: Explore the sand dunes and lagoon at Praia da Bordeira before heading to Cape St. Vincent and Sagres.

Day 10: Early morning transfer from Lagos to Faro.
Similar to day 7 in the previous 7-day Lisbon to Algarve road trip itinerary.

– Accommodation

We’ve carefully selected some amazing hotels in prime locations:

– Getting there and around

  • Getting to Portugal: Fly into Porto and out of Faro (or vice versa).
    Compare prices on flights with Skyscanner.
  • Porto to Faro road trip: This 10-day Portugal itinerary does require a rental car from day 2 to day 4 and from day 7 to day 10. You could return the first car to the rental company by the end of day 4 and pick up a new one after your Bélem visit on day 7. It may very well be possible, however, that this won’t influence the total price that much since the longer you rent, the lower the daily rental cost. When calculating your cost, take into account parking costs at your Lisbon accommodation and the one-way fee from one city to the other.
    Click here to get the best car rental deal for your Portugal itinerary.
  • Algarve boat trips: Especially if you plan to visit Portugal during summer, we’d recommend booking ahead. Here are our favorite suggestions:

Portugal itinerary 14 days: See all of Portugal in 2 weeks

When you have the luxury of spending 2 weeks in Portugal, then this ultimate itinerary is for you. It takes you to all the must-sees and even to some lesser-known gems. Check out this 14-day Portugal itinerary on the map:

Portugal map showing the 14 day Portugal itinerary suggestion

Again here, since this Portugal itinerary involves more cities than beaches, we’d recommend to avoid peak summer. Spring or September are the best time to visit Portugal with this 2 week itinerary.

– Day by day itinerary

Faro is one of the destinations listed in this 14-day Portugal itinerary
Cascais is one of the destinations listed in this two week Portugal itinerary

Since this 14-day Portugal itinerary is based on the previous one, we’ll just be mentioning the add-ons here.

Day 2: Guimarães and Braga.
Start your day with a trip to Braga, which is considered to be the religious centre of Portugal. But don’t let that image scare you off, because the city’s home to a thriving student population too. Within its maze of narrow streets, baroque architecture and pretty squares, Braga is a joy to explore.
Then head to Guimarães, the birthplace of Portugal. The 10th century Castle of Guimarães is said to be the place where D. Afonso Henriques, the first king of Portugal, was born. It’s a pleasure to walk the cobbled, often arched streets while admiring the authentic houses with their cast iron balconies. On a clear day, you can enjoy magnificent views over the city from the cable car to the Monte da Penha.

Day 5: Alcobaça.
If you like religious architecture, then you’ll be pleased to combine your visit to the Batalha monastery with one to the Alcobaça monastery. This grand complex in early-Gothic style, which is less decorative than the Manueline-styled Mosteiro da Batalha, was commissioned after the Moors were banned from central Portugal by the Christian Crusades.

Day 7: Évora.
Évora, located in the heart of the Alentejo region in Central Portugal, is one of Portugal’s oldest cities. It’s an authentic city with plenty of historical elements such as the Roman ruins and the university building. And then there’s the macabre Chapel of Bones with stacks of skulls and bones from floor to ceiling.

Day 13: Cascais.
One of the Portuguese cities that enchanted us most, is seaside Cascais. Located just half an hour from Lisbon, this gorgeous town used to be a holiday retreat for the royal family. With pretty squares, picturesque streets, fancy boutiques, a scenic biking trail and plenty of interesting museums, here’s no lack of things to do in Cascais.
Thanks to its location near Sintra, Cascais also makes for a wonderful base to visit the palaces. Two bus connections can take you there: the speedy line 417 and the scenic 403. So, instead of spending 3 nights in Lisbon you could just as well spend 1 or 2 nights in Cascais.

– Accommodation

Here are some amazing hotels in prime locations that will complete your Portugal experience.

  • 1 night in Porto: The Porto A.S. 1829 is located in the heart of Porto yet within walking distance of the Sao Bento train station.
  • 2 nights in Douro valley: The Douro 41 Hotel & Spa offers the most stunning river views, even from the panoramic pool.
  • 2 nights in Batalha: Hotel Villa Batalha or Hotel Casa Do Outeiro make for a wonderful travel base to explore the monasteries as well as the seaside town of Óbidos.
  • 2 nights in Évora: The Casas Caiadas or Convento do Espinheiro Historic Hotel & Spa have everything you need for a relaxing stay in Évora.
  • 3 nights in Lagos: Two gorgeous boutique hotels in the heart of Lagos are Casa Mãe & Lagos Avenida Hotel. The family-friendly Cascade Wellness Resort offers the most stunning ocean views.
  • 3 nights in Lisbon: Both The Lisboans Apartments and Memmo Alfama are located in the enchanting Alfama district, just a short walk from the historic Santa Apolónia railway station and close to the stop of iconic 28 E (E stands for Eléctrico or tram).
    Alternatively, you can spend just 1 night in Lisbon after staying in Cascais for 2 nights: Villa Casais is a luxurious retreat in the heart of this charming seaside town, close to all public transport.

– Getting there and around

Round up of these Portugal trip itineraries

7-day Portugal itinerary: Lisbon and Porto

  1. Lisbon.
    . . .Overnight stay in Lisbon.
  2. Belém.
    . . .Overnight stay in Lisbon.
  3. Day trip to Sintra.
    . . .Overnight stay in Lisbon.
  4. Day trip to Évora.
    . . .Overnight stay in Lisbon.
  5. Porto.
    . . .Overnight stay in Porto.
  6. Day trip to Douro valley.
    . . .Overnight stay in Porto.
  7. Porto.

Public transportation and/or organized tours, no need to rent a car.

7-day Portugal itinerary: Lisbon to Algarve

  1. Lisbon.
    . . .Overnight stay in Lisbon.
  2. Belém.
    . . .Overnight stay in Lisbon.
  3. Day trip to Sintra (or Évora).
    . . .Overnight stay in Lisbon.
  4. Lisbon to Lagos (Vicentine Coast).
    . . .Overnight stay in Lagos.
  5. Algarve.
    . . .Overnight stay in Lagos.
  6. Lagos.
    . . .Overnight stay in Lagos.
  7. Faro.

Rental car required for day 4 to day 7. Take into account the one-way fee.

10-day Portugal itinerary: Porto, Lisbon and Algarve

  1. Porto.
    . . .Overnight stay in Porto.
  2. Douro valley.
    . . .Overnight stay in Porto.
  3. Aveiro, Costa Nova and Batalha.
    . . .Overnight stay in Batalha.
  4. Nazaré and Óbidos.
    . . .Overnight stay in Lisbon.
  5. Lisbon.
    . . .Overnight stay in Lisbon.
  6. Day trip to Sintra.
    . . .Overnight stay in Lisbon.
  7. Belém and Lisbon to Algarve drive (Vicentine Coast).
    . . .Overnight stay in Lagos.
  8. Lagos.
    . . .Overnight stay in Lagos.
  9. Lagos and Sagres.
    . . .Overnight stay in Lagos.
  10. Faro.

Rental car required for days 2 to 4 plus days 7 to 10. Take into account the one-way fee.

14-day Portugal itinerary: Visit all must-sees in two weeks

  1. Porto.
    . . .Overnight stay in Porto.
  2. Braga and Guimarães.
    . . .Overnight stay in Douro Valley.
  3. Douro valley.
    . . .Overnight stay in Douro Valley.
  4. Aveiro, Costa Nova and Coimbra.
    . . .Overnight stay in Batalha.
  5. Batalha and Alcobaças.
    . . .Overnight stay in Batalha.
  6. Nazaré and Óbidos.
    . . .Overnight stay in Évora.
  7. Évora.
    . . .Overnight stay in Évora.
  8. Faro.
    . . .Overnight stay in Lagos.
  9. Algarve beaches and hikes.
    . . .Overnight stay in Lagos.
  10. Lagos and Sagres.
    . . . .Overnight stay in Lagos.
  11. Vicentine Coast.
    . . . .Overnight stay in Lisbon.
  12. Sintra.
    . . . .Overnight stay in Lisbon.
  13. Cascais and Belém.
    . . . .Overnight stay in Lisbon.
  14. Lisbon.

Rental car required for day 2 to day 10. Take into account the one-way fee.

Driving in Portugal

Toll needs to be taken into account when driving in Portugal is part of your Portugal itinerary

Three of the four Portugal itineraries we suggest, involve road trips. While driving in Portugal is pretty straightforward, there are some minor things that to consider before booking your rental car:

  • Electric toll roads: Driving in Portugal is not free. All highways are equipped with toll radars. Most are fully electronic, only the main roads near the cities may have toll booths. When you only have a few days in Portugal to spend, you don’t want to queue at the booths or worse, go to the post office to pay your toll (which can only be done between 2 and 5 working days after you passed). Therefore, we strongly suggest you to go with a more convenient solution. At your car rental company, you can optionally hire a Via Verde transponder. It allows you to bypass the toll booths and take the lanes marked as Via Verde. The transponder is linked to your car rental account so that, at the end of your road trip in Portugal, the total toll amount is added to your final bill.
    Where we rented our car, the charge for the transponder was €1.85 per day with a maximum of €18.45 per rental (VAT incl.). The rental agency did block a €75 deposit which was refunded at the end of our rental period.
  • Highway exits can be extremely short. When there’s heavy traffic, this can result in queues. Be careful when exiting and, if there’s no traffic, act swiftly yet carefully.
  • In the cities, you may find yourself in a maze of super-narrow streets. The perfect opportunity to test your driving skills.

Well, you’re all set to enjoy the Portugal (road trip) itinerary of your choice. Whether you prefer the cultural breaks or a combination of cities and relaxation, we’re confident you’ll have a fabulous time in Portugal! Feel free to reach out should you have any questions. And if you tried and tested one of these Portugal sample itineraries, then we’d love to hear all about your trip.

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